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Category: Web Development

Migrate Sprockets to Webpacker with React-rails

Ruby on Rails recently launched support for compiling static assets, such as JavaScript, using Webpack. Among other things, Webpack is more powerful at JS compilation when compared to the previous Rails default of Sprockets. Integration with Rails is provided by the Webpacker gem. Several features that I was interested in leveraging were tree shaking and support for the NPM package repository. With Sprockets, common JS libraries such as ReactJS had to be imported using Gems such as react-rails or classnames-rails. This added friction to adding new dependencies and upgrading to new versions of dependencies.

A couple of my projects used react-rails to render React components on the server-side using the legacy Sprockets system. This worked well, but I wanted to migrate to Webpacker to easily upgrade to the newest versions of React and React Bootstrap (previously I imported this using the reactbootstrap-rails, but this stopped being maintained with the launch of Webpacker.) However, migrating React components to support Webpack required changes to every single file adding ES6-style imports, file moves/renames, and scoping changes. This would have been too large to do all at once. What if there was a way to slowly migrate the JS code from Sprockets to Webpack, making components in either side available to the other side?

Fast development environments

Setting up new hosts entries for every different web site that you develop is hard. This workflow allows you to completely automate it. First thing you’ll want to do is setup a wildcard DNS record that points to your host. This allows you to dynamically setup new development websites without having create new DNS records for each one of them. I created a fake internal-only TLD on my local network’s DNS server that automatically returns the IP address of my development VM for any query to *.devvm. If you don’t have access to that, you could re-use an actual domain and automatically forward something like *.dev.technowizardry.net to the VM. For example, I have the ASUS RT-AC68U router for my personal network. So I SSH’d to the router, typed vi /etc/dnsmasq.conf, then appended: